Mango Sorbet and Berries

All I can say is YUM! Choices for vegan, gluten-free desserts are usually quite slim…often just fruit. This simple-to-assemble dessert is a staple at our house. I always make sure to have Trader Joe’s Mango Sorbet, Limoncello and fresh berries on hand. (frozen will work, in a pinch) This dessert makes any dinner end on a special note. (you could leave out the limoncello, if you don’t care for adding alcohol)

Now, some of my viewers may think this isn’t really a recipe…and you’re right! It’s more of an idea but I just had to share it with you.

The dish you use can make all the difference; I love fancy!

I just start with a generous scoop of the sorbet, a handful of the berries (I prefer raspberries and blueberries) and a splash of the limoncello over the top…it kind of makes little crystals…really cool texture! You can play around with toppings but in the years that I’ve been making this little gem, I have to say this combination is my favorite!

Apart from the small amount of alcohol in the limoncello and sugar in the sorbet, this dessert carries many health benefits! Berries, mangos and lemons are such power-houses.

I’ve written about mango and lemons in past seaons so let’s focus on berries. They are one of the most nutrient foods on the planet.

Blueberries are packed with antioxidants, called anthocyanins, that may help keep memory sharp as you age, and raspberries contain ellagic acid, a compound with anti-cancer properties. All berries are great sources of fiber, a nutrient important for a healthy digestive system. But if you need more reasons to dig into summer’s sun-kissed little fruits, look no further than two new studies, which suggest that berries may be good for your heart and your bones as well.

In a study of 72 middle-age people published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, eating just under a cup of mixed berries daily for eight weeks was associated with increased levels of “good” HDL cholesterol and lowered blood pressure, two positives when it comes to heart health.

Polyphenols like ellagic acid and anthocyanins may increase levels of nitric oxide, a molecule that produces a number of heart-healthy effects. One is helping to relax blood vessels, which subsequently results in lowered blood pressure. Polyphenols may also help preserve bone density after menopause, according to new research in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. More research is needed but the data suggest that eating even a small amount of blueberries each day—perhaps as little as 1/4 cup—could be good for anyone’s bones. (source: www.eatingwell.com)

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